Monday, March 16, 2009

East Greenland anorak, ca. 1850-1892. Inventory number 1071-2. Courtesy of the Museum Volkenkunde, Leiden


East Greenland anorak and mittens, ca. 1925-1934. Inventory 2823-2. Courtesy of the Museum Volkenkunde, Leiden


Jaap van Zuylen wearing a Greenland anorak. Courtesy of the Museum Volkenkunde, Leiden


East Greenland anorak, ca. 1960-1970. Inventory number: 4458-81. Courtesy of the Museum Volkenkunde, Leiden


Pair of sealskin mittens (aaqqatit) AOA Ethno 2001,Am14.15ab. Courtesy the British Museum


Kayak jacket of sealskin (tuilik) AOA Ethno 2001,Am14.1. Courtesy the British Museum


Inspiration for a future sewing project.

I found some 6.5 oz. waxed cotton which has a nice translucency, not unlike the anoraks made with seal intestine. Below is a prototype made with cotton twill from a pattern from the Rain Shed.



8 comments:

Tom said...

excellent post. did you use the rain shed cagoule pattern, but leave it a bit shorter and sans upper zipper? how was this pattern to follow? ever since i was a kid i've been obsessed with re-creating the anoraks in Tintin in Tibet.

alford said...

Thanks. Yes, it's the cagoule pattern. I had to modify it a bit to make it an xs. The pattern is fairly easy to follow, but I would recommend reading through it several times. The next one will be a bit longer.

Tom said...

understood. now, it looks like the arm openings are vast on this thing - or is that a trick of the angle.

Lynn said...

I'm so impressed! I love the big front pocket.

alford said...

The arm openings are large but the fabric falls nicely. Good for layering.

Anonymous said...

looks great john cant wait to see the wax model bettina has some wonderful pics of her grandfather training in the alps ill send them to u when we get settled as there packed away see u soon c&b

Perfectly Disgraceful said...

Funny that Tom mentioned Tintin in Tibet, Patrick just read it to Lily (and it's for sale at the store!). Maddie and I are reading Julie of the Wolves in which Julie not only makes a new mitten from a rabbit she snared, but also uses a caribou hide to make a tent, a sled and snowshoes.

alford said...

Julie of the Wolves sounds right up my alley!